Electronic Press Kits (EPK’s)

One thing that every artist needs is an EPK (short for electronic press kit). EPK’s will primarily serve as a musician’s resume. It can be a lot of work to set up an EPK, but it’s well worth it, especially if you’re looking to get some high-profile gigs. A good EPK is invaluable to creating a great outbound marketing strategy.

 


 

If you’re serious about building a career in the music industry and want to be taken seriously, you definitely need to get one. An electronic press kit is a traditional promo package in digital form.

 

The EPK, should always contains bio info about the band recent releases etc, but can also include press photos, videos, info about upcoming tour dates, backline requirements and more. It is easier to cram info into an electronic press kit than a traditional promo package, and EPKs help keep costs down because there is not postage required to send them. However, be aware that not everyone you wish to target with a press package is open to receiving EPKs – be sure to find out the preferences of the people you are contacting.

 

  • A short demo (or in the case of an electronic press kit, an mp3 clip of your music).
  • A neatly assembled collection of any press you have received.
  • A one-page press release detailing what you are presenting with the promo package, be it a new album, a tour, a new single or something else.
  • A short bio (one page).
  • A color photo of the band (if the promo package is going to the press).

 

Promo packages are most often used as a tool to promote bands to record labels, to the media, and to managers/agents/promoters. Any music industry person can use a promo package to promote the projects on which they are working, however, and many do.
So, what do Overdrive need to create your custom EPK?

 

Short Bio

A short bio should generally be about 150 to 300 words. You’ll more than likely be sending out the short bio in emails to music supervisors of venues and festivals. Therefore, you should use a it to hit the main points about you and your music. Don’t be too generic, but don’t be too fanciful. You generally want to leave the reader with a reason to read the lengthy bio and check out more of your EPK.

 

Long Bio

These tend to be a bit more in-depth. You should aim for about 700 words but no more than 1000. This is not a play-by-play of your life and inspiration. Personally, I think biographies should be written in first person, but that’s debatable. If you’re in the process of writing your artist bio, try writing a formal third person bio and a first-person bio, then decide which one works best for you.

 

A Few Songs

Most likely the first thing that anyone checks when they find a new artist. You should generally make sure that this section is pristine. We would recommend you have about 3 – 5 songs in your EPK. Make sure to include your best studio recordings and live recordings if you have them. EPK’s are an introductory tool so you should list your discography but don’t include every song.

 

Photo Reel

Take a lot of pictures to show off your band’s style. Photos have nothing to do with the music, but they do help to give the event directors a look into the kind of experience that they will be funding. If a picture truly is worth a thousand words, then you need to make sure that yours are saying all the right things. Please note, that this doesn’t mean you have to be clean-cut. Depending on your style of music, a clean-cut image may or may not be relevant. However, the quality of the photo should be immaculate.

 

Video Reel

Your video reel should include both performance footage as well as stuff from music videos and interviews. Especially with regard to performance footage, it gives sponsors an idea of what to expect from the show if they hired you. (This is probably a good time to admonish you to give your best performance every single night.)

 

Press Releases and Buzz

If you do not have this section in your EPK, then you’ve completely missed the point of the “P” in EPK. Showing off reviews and interviews is a great way to show investors and sponsors that their trust in you is not misplaced. Simply put, a good review in the press can serve as a great social currency and make the difference between you and the next guy.